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  1. Nizamabad Constituency 2019 Mega Elections (A): Attempting the Improbable
    Operations Management Nizamabad Constituency 2019 Mega Elections (A): Attempting the Improbable

    During the Indian general election of 2019, the Nizamabad constituency in Telangana state found itself in an unprecedented situation with a record 185 candidates competing for one seat. Most of these candidates were local farmers who saw the election as a platform for raising awareness about local issues, particularly the perceived lack of government support for guaranteeing minimum support prices for their crops. More than 185 candidates had in fact contested elections from a single constituency in a handful of elections in the past. The Election Commission of India (ECI) had declared them to be "special elections" where it made exceptions to the original election schedule to accommodate the large number of candidates. However, in the 2019 general election, the ECI made no such exceptions, announcing instead that polling in Nizamabad would be conducted as per the original schedule and results would be declared at the same time as the rest of the country. This presented a unique and unexpected challenge for Rajat Kumar, the Telangana Chief Electoral Officer (CEO) and his team. How were they to conduct free and fair and elections within the mandated timeframe with the largest number of electronic voting machines (EVMs) ever deployed to address the will of 185 candidates in a constituency with 1.55 million voters from rural and semi-urban areas? Case A describes the electoral process followed by the world's largest democracy to guarantee free and fair elections. It concludes by posing several situational questions, the answers to which will determine whether the polls in Nizamabad are conducted successfully or not. Case B, which should be revealed after students have had a chance to deliberate on the challenges posed in Case A, describes the decisions and actions taken by Kumar and his team in preparation for the Nizamabad polls and the events that took place on election day and afterward.

    Learning Objective

    To demonstrate how a quantitative approach to decision making can be used in the public policy domain to achieve end goals. To learn how resource allocation decisions can be made by understanding the scale of the problem, the various resource constraints, and the end goals. To discover operational innovations in the face of regulatory and technical constraints and complete the required steps. To understand the multiple steps involved in conducting elections in the Indian context.

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    ₹399.00
  2. Telangana Graduates’ MLC Elections 2021: Handling Known and Unknown Uncertainties
    Operations Management Telangana Graduates’ MLC Elections 2021: Handling Known and Unknown Uncertainties

    The case is centered around the timeline of the Telangana graduates’ MLC elections 2021, which were held against the backdrop of a known unknown: the COVID-19 pandemic. The electoral officials had to be mindful of the numerous security protocols and complexities involved in implementing the election process in such uncertain times. They had to incorporate additional steps and plan for contingencies to mitigate risks while executing the election process. Halfway through the election planning process, it became clear that the number of voters and candidates was unprecedentedly large. This unexpected development necessitated a revision of the prior plan for conducting the elections. Shashank Goel, Chief Electoral Officer (CEO), and M. Satyavani, Deputy CEO, were architecting the plan for conducting the elections with an unexpectedly large number of voters and candidates under pandemic-induced disruptions. Goel was also reflecting on how to develop contingency plans for these elections, given the uncertainty produced by unforeseen external factors and the associated risks. Although he had the mandate to conduct free and fair elections within the stipulated timelines and was assured that the required resources would be provided, several factors had to be considered. According to the constitutional guidelines for the graduates' MLC elections, qualified and registered graduate voters could cast their vote by ranking candidates preferentially. Paper ballots had to be used because electronic voting machines (EVMs) could not handle preferential voting. The scale and magnitude of the elections necessitated jumbo ballot boxes. To manage the process, the number of polling stations had to be increased, and manpower had to be trained. Further, the presence of healthcare workers to ensure the safety of voters and the deployed staff was imperative. The Telangana CEO’s office had to meet the increased logistical and technical requirements and ensure high voting turnouts while executing the election process.

    Postponing the election was not an option for the ECI from the standpoint of the legal code of conduct. The Telangana CEO's office prepared a revised election plan. The project plan was amended to incorporate the need for additional resources and logistical support to execute the election process. As the efforts of the staff were maximized effectively, the elections could be conducted smoothly and transparently although a large number of candidates were in the fray.

    Teaching and Learning Objectives:

    The key case objectives are to enable students to:

    1. Appreciate the importance of effective project management, planning, and execution in public administration against the backdrop of uncertainties and complexities.
    2. Understand the importance of risk identification, risk planning, and prioritization.
    3. Learn strategies to manage various project risks in a real-life situation.
    4. Identify the characteristics of effective leadership in times of crisis and the key takeaways from such scenarios
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  3. The Great Union Journey: Amalgamation of Union Bank Of India, Andhra Bank, And Corporation Bank
    Human Resource Management The Great Union Journey: Amalgamation of Union Bank Of India, Andhra Bank, And Corporation Bank

    Set in April 2021, the case study traces the process of amalgamation of the Union Bank of India (UBI) with the erstwhile Andhra Bank (e-AB) and Corporation Bank (e-CB) following the announcement by the Ministry of Finance (MoF), Government of India (GoI), on August 30, 2019. With the Amalgamation Effective Date set as April 1, 2020, Rajkiran Rai G., the Managing Director (MD) and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of UBI, who oversaw the amalgamation project was faced with formidable challenges. The banks had distinctive cultures and values. While UBI was pan-national, the employee and customer compositions of the e-AB and e-CB reflected their regional dominance. The case documents how Rai and his team successfully integrated people, products, policies, cultures, technology, and customers within a stringent and short timeline. It describes the sustained efforts to unify employees under a common identity and align them toward the shared vision of becoming the best in the industry. The case provides an overview of the differentiated measures undertaken by Rai and his team to engage the different stakeholders, the governance structure for decision making and implementation, comprehensive measures to ensure transparency through communication and access to resources, meticulous planning, delegation, monitoring, and course corrections in the face of obstacles. One year after the AED, the financial performance of UBI testified to the success of the amalgamation. However, Rai had to foster a customer-centric and performance-oriented culture at UBI. He had to fortify the bank’s future prospects by institutionalizing the learnings from the transformation. As the bank embraced digital transformation more frequent changes were imminent. Rai had to tackle the challenge of building an agile, mission-driven, and learning-oriented organization.

    Learning Objectives:

    By analyzing the case, participants will learn to

    1. address the concerns of the different stakeholders in mergers and acquisitions,
    2. lead organizational transformation in general and overcome the challenges of transforming public-sector entities,
    3. promote collaborative cultures despite diverse backgrounds and priorities
    4. foster a learning culture in an organization -implement measures to enhance organizational agility.
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    ₹399.00
  4. SAP Labs India: Building an Inclusive Organization
    Human Resource Management SAP Labs India: Building an Inclusive Organization

    This case describes how SAP Labs India, a research and development center of SAP SE introduced and pursued a wide range of diversity and inclusion (D&I) programs across the organization. Set in September 2020, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, it narrates the story of Sap Labs' D&I journey of over a decade. Told from the perspective of Shraddhanjali Rao, VP, Human Resources, and other company executives, the case outlines and examines different diversity programs that were instituted around four pillars of D&I, namely, (i) gender, (ii) culture and identity (LGBTQ employees), (iii) cross-generational employees and (iv) differently abled people. The case discusses the company's efforts to promote awareness and adoption of its diversity goals across these four pillars and the challenges it faced along the way through the perspectives of a cross-section of program leaders. The case raises the following questions: Did the programmatic efforts to implement diversity initiatives lead to inclusion at SAP Labs? What were the challenges in promoting these initiatives? Did they degenerate to tokenism? What could SAP Labs have done better to institutionalize its commitment to diversity in the workplace? Beyond diversity, what more could SAP Labs do in the future to embrace an inclusive culture?

    Learning Objectives

    • Analyze diversity promotion programs and understand what works and what does not
    • Examine the role of various stakeholders in the design and implementation of D&I programs
    • Understand how to go beyond diversity and ensure inclusion
    • Determine key success factors for institutionalizing diversity and inclusion at workplaces
    • Understand and appreciate the business and organizational rationale for D&I
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    ₹399.00
  5. Grounding of the Boeing 737 Max 8 (B): The Road Ahead-Making The Boeing 737 Max Flightworthy Again
    Human Resource Management Grounding of the Boeing 737 Max 8 (B): The Road Ahead-Making The Boeing 737 Max Flightworthy Again

    In the short time between October 2018 and March 2019, two new Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplanes in different parts of the world were involved in deadly crashes. In both cases, the aircraft developed difficulties in seemingly calm weather and crashed shortly after takeoff, killing everyone on board. Preliminary investigations pointed to failures in a new automated software-driven system called the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) that had caused both aircraft to pitch forward and potentially nosedive. The probe also revealed gaps in the documentation and testing of the MCAS system and a lack of adequate pilot training. Case (A) delves into the causes of the 737 MAX crashes, Boeing leadership's questionable responses and poor crisis management, and the fallout from the grounding. It describes the erosion of a culture of integrity and mismatched management expectations that ultimately led to cutting corners and breakdowns in the engineering and development process. Participants have the opportunity to analyze the critical issues in the case and answer the crucial question posed by aviation expert Andy Stephen: How could a disaster of this magnitude occur in an industry so advanced and sophisticated, and so driven by safety? Case (B) looks at the timeline of events surrounding the recertification of the 737 MAX, from the investigations immediately following the first crash to early August 2020, when initial test flights for recertification commenced, following intense internal reviews. The case considers the sequence of events from various angles: regulatory approvals, the company's financial performance, its corporate culture, and how the COVID 19-related slowdown affected Boeing's efforts to get the 737 MAX off the ground. Stephen, having followed the events closely and having understood the gravity of the situation, poses the following key questions: What would it take for the MAX to fly again? And when could it happen?

    Learning Objective:

    The case can be used for discussion around:

    • Lessons learned for governance and management of complex organizations
    • Strategic decisions and risk management under uncertainty, competitive dynamics and time pressures
    • Leadership styles and impact on organizational culture, behaviour and risk of stress dysfunction
    • Guardrails and conflict resolution between marketplace drivers and engineering development
    • Nurturing an open organizational culture and alignment with business goals
    • Crisis management
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    ₹399.00
  6. Grounding Of the Boeing 737 Max 8 (A): What Went Wrong?
    Human Resource Management Grounding Of the Boeing 737 Max 8 (A): What Went Wrong?

    In the short time between October 2018 and March 2019, two new Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplanes in different parts of the world were involved in deadly crashes. In both cases, the aircraft developed difficulties in seemingly calm weather and crashed shortly after takeoff, killing everyone on board. Preliminary investigations pointed to failures in a new automated software-driven system called the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) that had caused both aircraft to pitch forward and potentially nosedive. The probe also revealed gaps in the documentation and testing of the MCAS system and a lack of adequate pilot training. Case (A) delves into the causes of the 737 MAX crashes, Boeing leadership's questionable responses and poor crisis management, and the fallout from the grounding. It describes the erosion of a culture of integrity and mismatched management expectations that ultimately led to cutting corners and breakdowns in the engineering and development process. Participants have the opportunity to analyze the critical issues in the case and answer the crucial question posed by aviation expert Andy Stephen: How could a disaster of this magnitude occur in an industry so advanced and sophisticated, and so driven by safety? Case (B) looks at the timeline of events surrounding the recertification of the 737 MAX, from the investigations immediately following the first crash to early August 2020, when initial test flights for recertification commenced, following intense internal reviews. The case considers the sequence of events from various angles: regulatory approvals, the company's financial performance, its corporate culture, and how the COVID 19-related slowdown affected Boeing's efforts to get the 737 MAX off the ground. Stephen, having followed the events closely and having understood the gravity of the situation, poses the following key questions: What would it take for the MAX to fly again? And when could it happen?

    Learning Objective:

    The case can be used for discussion around:

    • Lessons learned for governance and management of complex organizations
    • Strategic decisions and risk management under uncertainty, competitive dynamics and time pressures
    • Leadership styles and impact on organizational culture, behaviour and risk of stress dysfunction
    • Guardrails and conflict resolution between marketplace drivers and engineering development
    • Nurturing an open organizational culture and alignment with business goals
    • Crisis management
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    ₹399.00
  7. Merger of Equals: The Amalgamation Story of Indian Bank and Allahabad Bank
    General Management Merger of Equals: The Amalgamation Story of Indian Bank and Allahabad Bank

    On August 30, 2019, the Ministry of Finance of the Government of India (GoI) announced the consolidation of ten nationalized banks into four. As part of this move, Indian Bank and Allahabad Bank were to be merged into a single entity, and the new amalgamated bank had to start operations on April 1, 2020. Amalgamating two very different banks with thousands of branches and employees within a pre-set time window would be complex enough under normal circumstances, but the challenge was compounded by the advent of COVID-19 and the ensuing national lockdown in March 2020. Padmaja Chunduru, Managing Director (MD) & Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Indian Bank, was given the formidable task of overseeing the amalgamation process. The case study describes the actual integration process in detail and the thorough planning and execution involved. It illustrates the role of the Integration Management Office (IMO) as a central point of information dissemination and an empowered body in the merger process. It also lays out the myriad challenges of the amalgamation process - personnel integration, IT/banking system management, branch rationalization, and customer integration, and the steps taken to tackle each one. The COVID-19 pandemic came as an unknown midway through the integration process and required Chunduru and her team to rethink several aspects of the integration plan and strategy. The case study concludes with the actual mechanics of the amalgamation process. With the worst of the COVID-19 crisis behind them, Chunduru looks towards building a bank of the future. Having undergone rationalization in several areas, Indian Bank not only emerged in a better financial state than before but also laid down its vision as a future-ready bank. How could the learnings from the integration process be made a continuous process and become part of the organization's DNA? These were the key questions facing Chunduru and her team.

    1. To deliberate and evaluate the best ways to plan, organize and implement the enormous task of merging two large, similarly-sized organizations.
    2. To emphasize the importance of careful and detailed integration planning, stakeholder management, and the role of leadership in a successful merger.
    3. To illustrate the critical role of well-defined organizational structures in supporting integration efforts.
    4. To deliberate how the bank can rebrand itself as a preferred bank of the younger generation.
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    ₹399.00
  8. Nizamabad Constituency 2019 Mega Elections (B): Engineering a Triumph for the Indian Electoral Machinery
    Operations Management Nizamabad Constituency 2019 Mega Elections (B): Engineering a Triumph for the Indian Electoral Machinery

    During the Indian general election of 2019, the Nizamabad constituency in Telangana state found itself in an unprecedented situation with a record 185 candidates competing for one seat. Most of these candidates were local farmers who saw the election as a platform for raising awareness about local issues, particularly the perceived lack of government support for guaranteeing minimum support prices for their crops. More than 185 candidates had in fact contested elections from a single constituency in a handful of elections in the past. The Election Commission of India (ECI) had declared them to be "special elections" where it made exceptions to the original election schedule to accommodate the large number of candidates. However, in the 2019 general election, the ECI made no such exceptions, announcing instead that polling in Nizamabad would be conducted as per the original schedule and results would be declared at the same time as the rest of the country. This presented a unique and unexpected challenge for Rajat Kumar, the Telangana Chief Electoral Officer (CEO) and his team. How were they to conduct free and fair and elections within the mandated timeframe with the largest number of electronic voting machines (EVMs) ever deployed to address the will of 185 candidates in a constituency with 1.55 million voters from rural and semi-urban areas? Case A describes the electoral process followed by the world's largest democracy to guarantee free and fair elections. It concludes by posing several situational questions, the answers to which will determine whether the polls in Nizamabad are conducted successfully or not. Case B, which should be revealed after students have had a chance to deliberate on the challenges posed in Case A, describes the decisions and actions taken by Kumar and his team in preparation for the Nizamabad polls and the events that took place on election day and afterward.

    Learning Objective

    To demonstrate how a quantitative approach to decision making can be used in the public policy domain to achieve end goals. To learn how resource allocation decisions can be made by understanding the scale of the problem, the various resource constraints, and the end goals. To discover operational innovations in the face of regulatory and technical constraints and complete the required steps. To understand the multiple steps involved in conducting elections in the Indian context.

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    ₹399.00
  9. SpiceJet: Flying in the Face of Imminent Shutdown
    Strategy SpiceJet: Flying in the Face of Imminent Shutdown

    This case describes the plight of SpiceJet, an Indian low-cost airline that found itself in an acute liquidity crisis and on the brink of closure in December 2014. By the month's end, SpiceJet had no money to fuel its planes, run its operations or pay salaries, airport duties and taxes. Oil companies had refused to extend further credit to the airline until it settled its past dues. By late 2014, the operational footprint of SpiceJet, which had ballooned to 59 destinations, deflated when the airline had to reduce its fleet to 32 planes from 58 planes within a short span of six months. The lessors demanded that the planes be returned to them to reduce their risk exposure in SpiceJet. In January 2015, Ajay Singh, former chairman and founder of SpiceJet, came back on board five years after he sold the airline to media baron Kalanithi Maran of Sun Group. Singh was asked to bring the troubled airline back on track, a task that was fraught with challenges. Apart from managing the liquidity crisis, Singh had to find a way for SpiceJet to retain its key routes with a smaller fleet and recover ground where SpiceJet had been forced to recede. It was also crucial to raise employee morale and win back customer confidence and trust in the brand. The case unfolds the structural challenges of the Indian airline industry, which is characterized by steep discounting and overcapacity that eventually results in the underutilization of assets. Only an airline with limitless access to capital or very high operational efficiencies is likely to survive in this sector.

    Learning Objective

    This case can be mapped for both MBA and Executive MBA courses in Strategy and Operations Management to: 1. Illustrate the operational dynamics of the airline industry and analyze dominant strategies. 2. Examine the plight of an airline going through a liquidity crisis. 3. Evaluate a comeback strategy that tweaks operational parameters and helps with better resource management. 4. Understand critical of aspects of revenue management

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    ₹399.00
  10. Sterlite Power: Technology as a Point of Differentiation
    Strategy Sterlite Power: Technology as a Point of Differentiation

    This case aims to give participants an understanding of how Sterlite Power (Sterlite) successfully differentiated itself using technology in an otherwise traditional sector in an emerging economy. Sterlite deployed technological innovations to reduce inefficiencies in power transmission projects. The major challenges for the Indian power sector are the use of obsolete technology and high cost coupled with a low profit margin model. These make power evacuation difficult and inefficient, resulting in frequent power shortages in a country that actually generates surplus power. Although many private players had entered the power sector, there were no significant changes in the way projects were carried out. Realizing that products alone wouldn't improve its business prospects, Sterlite used technology as a disrupter and a differentiator to provide solutions in the power sector. The case shows how an Indian firm revolutionized project execution to get an edge in the Indian market. Having succeeded in India, the company turned its sights on the Brazilian market. The case invites participants to explore the following questions: What could be the possible challenges that lay ahead for Sterlite and how could it leverage its learning from India in Brazil? How challenging is it for companies to use technology as a point of differentiation and to monetize it in the long run, and in different markets?

    Learning Objective

    1. To understand the nature of the Indian power sector and analyze the various challenges faced by transmission companies
    2. To gain a deeper understanding of Sterlite's innovations
    3. To understand how Sterlite successfully leveraged new technologies to cut down project inefficiencies in the power transmission market
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    ₹399.00

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